Telecure

TC_scenarios

Sketching scenarios helped us clarify the user needs that can be solved with Telecure.

Removing Blockers to Customer Conversion

Our Goal

Telecure is a telemedicine startup that allows customers to receive medical care, including prescriptions, by phone. When I came on board, the startup’s goal was to increase the conversion rate of website visitors who became paying customers. I collaborated with another UX designer, Daisy Wang, and the founders, engineer and sales and growth teams to learn, build, test and repeat.

The startup’s goal was to increase the conversion rate of website visitors who became paying customers.

User Research

Previous designers had created a customer journey map, personas, and the phone call flow. Daisy and I started our user research by interviewing three customer service reps to gain insights into the minds of callers (the prospective customers). The sales team listened in on the interviews, and we all captured key takeaways. Using sticky notes to help us synthesize the results, we concluded that the two biggest blockers to customer conversion were:

  • Users didn’t understand the telemedicine concept.
  • Users didn’t trust the company.

Through customer service interviews, we learned that users didn’t understand or trust the product.

To help us better empathize with our users, Daisy and I created a list and sketched scenarios to think through the user problems being addressed by the product.

Usability Tests and Learnings

Before we came on board, a new landing page design had been created but not yet shipped. Our next step was to determine whether or not users trusted and understood the new version better than the other. To test this, we ran 5-second tests on both sites. The results: the original site faired slightly better than the redesign, but both sites failed to convey trust and the concept of telemedicine.

For comparison, we 5-second-tested the landing pages of two competitive sites. They both failed to communicate an understanding of the service. Only one of them appeared trustworthy to users. We hypothesized that users needed more time to view the page, as well as different messaging to “get it” and to trust it.

TC_orig

The existing site at the time (left) and the proposed redesign (right) were tested. Using the 5-second test through UsabilityHub, we asked users, “What do you think this page was about?” and “Did the brand appear trustworthy?” The results showed that users didn’t get it or trust it.

For our next tests, we wireframed three versions of a landing page, each with different messaging, and tested them guerrilla-style. We learned that the “Get medical care by phone” headline best conveyed the service, but no one trusted it.

We guessed that the lack of visual design had caused the lack of trust. I tested this assumption by adding minimal visual design touches to the landing page so it looked like a real website, and it worked. In the next round of guerrilla tests, most users got the concept and thought the company was legitimate. The engineer launched this version of the site. With slight modifications, it also worked as a flyer for the sales team to take to the streets.

TC_wires

TC_wire_visual

Guerrilla-testing wireframes helped us learn what messaging worked best. Not until I added minimal visual polish did users feel the brand was trustworthy.

Marketing

While the UX team had been rapidly testing and iterating on the landing page, the growth team was doing the same with ad campaigns. With the revised landing page in place, I created a Facebook cover page and ads for brand consistency. Turning the headline into a descriptive tagline (Medical Care by Phone), and highlighting the 3-step user process, were decisions I made to reinforce the viewer’s understanding of how the service works.

TC_FacebookFacebook cover page and advertisement.

Summary

Through our iterative work on messaging and visual design, we improved two key blockers to customer conversion: understanding the service and trusting the company.

By following Lean UX practices, we helped Telecure increase the conversion rate of website visitors into paying customers. We did this by understanding users’ perspectives and needs, hypothesizing and building solutions, testing the results, then repeating the loop. Through our iterative work on messaging and visual design, we improved two key blockers to customer conversion: understanding the service and trusting the company.

  • Categories:  UX Design, Website
  • Client: Telecure
  • Product: Website, Facebook Ads
  • Ship Date: 2014